The Last Day of Summer?

September 1st was not only Labor Day in the US but officially the last day of summer. So tell that to the weather! In San Antonio, since the start of August, we have been experiencing temperatures that frequently touch on the 100s – though the mornings have just started to be cooler, there is a fresher smell in the air and distinctly more cloud cover during the day.

We enjoyed a respite from the heat during a recent holiday in San Francisco, visiting Mike’s daughter and family who live in the mural-covered Mission district. This is a largely Hispanic area that reminds me of a mixture of Southtown San Antonio and New York. I had forgotten, since my first stay in San Francisco thirty years ago, how lush a place it is – lemon and peppercorn trees laden with fruit, shocking pink passionvines with saucer-size blooms and an abundance of shrubs and flowers of every shape and colour. What I had not forgotten was how chilly the city can be, especially in the mornings when low lying mist can take a while to clear. On the plane back to Texas, Mike, Mattie and I all at various times muttered how we welcomed the summer heat of San Antonio!

The foliage in this city can be just as stunning as San Francisco. The mainstay of the south Texas garden is, or should be, the drought-tolerant Texas native plant. I say ‘should be’ because only recently have native plants and xeriscape landscaping come into favour here. Indeed, a charming old South Texas gardening book that I found in a second-hand bookshop sports a picture of daffodils on its dust cover! I have to profess a real admiration for the native shrubs and perennials that take such a battering from the summer heat and later, the odd days of freezing temperatures in winter. With the help of a gardening book that Mattie and Mike bought me for Mother’s Day and some advice from the Botanical Garden where I volunteer on a weekly basis, I have very much enjoyed planting out our garden. The latest native plant to go in is called ‘chocolate soldiers’ which has lovely brownish green floppy leaves and tall violet spikes. I have planted it close to a lime coloured squid agave and a bluish-green twist leaf yucca in the bed under the ash trees outside my study (there are currently a couple of squirrels scampering around it). On the other side of the garden (or ‘yard’ as they say here), in the bed that runs the length of the swimming pool, I have planted a variety of Texas sages (blue, white, cyclamen, coral and scarlet), Mexican marigolds, milkweed, some prickly pear cactus and grasses, amongst others. Many of these plants are dormant during this hottest part of summer and the colours of the foliage therefore less intense than in San Francisco. Two days after our return, Mattie, togged up in new school clothes and smart new trainers, started Grade 7 at her middle school and Mike and I took the opportunity of some time to ourselves to see the new, and very enjoyable, Woody Allen film, Blue Jasmine. Some of the scenes were shot close to the area where we had stayed in San Francisco. And the chilly air-conditioned cinema reminded me of those cloudy mornings of our holiday!

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